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rich dad, poor dad

Page history last edited by PBworks 16 years, 5 months ago

a couple of months ago i read Robert T. Kiyosaki's Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

It is kind of of selfhelp book, but not the kind that tels you how to lose 234567 pounds or how to get over a guy. It helps you understand the power of your decision about money.

it changed my whole vision about the way i spend money(i actualy start saving????).

this was the second book i read in english and even i didnt understand some of the words it was very easy to read.

I dont know if any of you has read that book, but if you havent defenatly do. espacialy you Drew.

he is a guy who drew up with a very educated father who didnt know anything about investants or remixing:) money. his best friend's fother was the workoholic on the islan who eventualy became one of the richest men there. Robert grew up with both of them and the different points of view. thats why he names his first book after his both fathers.

i would like to give you some of his thought on this page, from that book and his other books.


 

Galina, this book sounds interesting, indeed--a self-help book that tells a story. From your description, Rich Dad, Poor Dad seems to be a study in contrast, with the focus being what used to be the financial fulcrum of the nuclear family, the male parent. Could you provide a link to a web presence for the book? Or quote a passage from the book? As this page grows, you will be able to fashion it into a unit assignment--our evaluation assignment, which comes later this semester.

 

ShareRiff


{http://www.richdad.com/}

I had two fathers, a rich one and a poor one. One was highly educated and intelligent; he had Ph.D. and completed four years of undergraduate work in less than two years. He then went on to Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and Nortwestern University to do his advanced studies, all on full financial scholarships. the other father never finished eighth grade.

Both men were succesful in theur careers, working hard all their lives. both earned substantial incomes. Yet one struggled financially all his life. The other would become one of the richest men in Hawaii. One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities and his church. The other left bills to be paid.

Both men were strong, charismatic and influental. Both men offered me advice, but they did not advise the same things. Both men believed strongly in education but did not recommend the same course of study.

If i had only one dad, I would have had to accept or reject his advice...

Instead of simply accepting or rejecting one or the other, I found myself thinking more, comparing and then choosing for myself.

The problem was the rich man was not rich yet and the poor man not yet poor. Both were just starting outh on their carrers, and both were struggling with money and families. Buth they had very different point of view about the subject of money.

For example, one dad would say, "The love of money is the root of all evil." The other, "The lack of money is the root of all evil."

...As a process, choosing for myslef turned out to be much more valuable in the long run, rather than simply accepting or rejecting a single point of view.

One of the reasons the rich get richer, the poor get poorer, and the middle calss struggles in debt is beacause the subject of money is taught at home, not in school. Most of us learn about money from our parents. So what can a poor parent tell their child about money? They simply say "Stay in school and study hard." The child may graduate with excellent grades but with poor person's financial programming and mind-set. It was learned while the child was young.

...Because I had two influential fathers, I learned from both of them. I had to think about each dad's advice, and in doing so, I gained valuable insight into the power and effect of one's thoughts on one's life. For example, one dad had a habit of saying, "I can't afford it." The other dad forbade those words to be used. He insisted I say, "How can i afford it?" One is a statement, and the other is a question. One lets you off the hook, and the other forces you to think. My soon-to-be-rich dad would explain that by aoutomaticlly saying the words "I can't afford it," your brain stops working. By asking question "How can I afford it?" your brain is put to work. He did not mean buy everything you wanted.... "My brain gets stronger every day because i exescise it. The stronger it gets, the more money I can make." He believed thet automaticlly saying "I can't afford it" was a sign of mental laziness.


Sara Jane's Remix

{http://www.richdad.com/}

I had two fathers, a rich one and a poor one. As one was highly educated, intelligent and could afford school, the other father couldn't afford school. He didn't even finish eighth grade. The rich father recieved his Ph.D. and completed four years of undergraduate work in less than two years. He then went on to Stanford University, the University of Chicago, and Nortwestern University to do his advanced studies, all on full financial scholarships.

Both men were succesful in their careers, working hard all their lives and earning substantial incomes. Unfortunately one struggled financially as the other would become one of the richest men in Hawaii. One died leaving tens of millions of dollars to his family, charities and his church. While the other left bills to be paid.

Both men were strong, charismatic and influental. As both men offered me advice they did not advise the same things. Both men believed strongly in education but did not recommend the same course of study.

If I had only one dad, I would have had to accept or reject his advice...

Instead of simply accepting or rejecting one or the other, I found myself thinking more, comparing and then choosing for myself.

The problem was the wealthy man was not rich yet and the poor man was not yet poor. Both were just starting out on their careers, and were struggling with money and families. Both had very different points of view about the subject of money.

For example, one dad would say, "The love of money is the root of all evil." The other, "The lack of money is the root of all evil."

...As a process, choosing for myslef turned out to be much more valuable in the long run, rather than simply accepting or rejecting a single point of view.

One of the reasons the rich get richer, the poor get poorer, and the middle class struggles in debt is beacause the subject of money is taught at home, not in school. Most of us learn about money from our parents. What can a poor parent tell their child about money? They simply say "Stay in school and study hard." The child may graduate with excellent grades would familar with the poor person's financial programming and mind-set. The child learned these characteristics while growing up around this type of enviroment.

...Because I had two influential fathers, I learned from both of them. I had to think about each dad's advice, and in doing so, I gained valuable insight into the power and effect of one's thoughts on one's life. For example, one dad had a habit of saying, "I can't afford it." The other dad forbade those words to be used. He insisted I say, "How can i afford it?" One is a statement, and the other is a question. One lets you off the hook, and the other forces you to think. My soon-to-be-rich dad would explain that by automaticlly saying the words "I can't afford it," your brain stops working. By asking the question "How can I afford it?" your brain is put to work. He did not mean, buy everything you wanted.... "My brain gets stronger every day because I exescise it. The stronger it gets, the more money I can make." He believed that automaticlly saying "I can't afford it" was a sign of mental laziness.

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